Consequences of Defaulting on Hard Money Loans

Hard money loans are a common way to fund a real estate project. In many cases, these loans can be used to buy properties that banks won’t finance because of their riskier nature. However, if you default on one of these loans there will be consequences. This article discusses the repercussions of not paying back a hard money loan and how they differ from other types of financing options.

You May Lose Your Property

If you can’t make your payments on a hard money loan, the lender has the right to take possession of the property that serves as collateral for the loan. This means you could lose your home or business if you can’t come up with the cash to pay back your debt.

You’ll Likely Face Legal Action

Hard money lenders are typically more aggressive than traditional banks when it comes to collecting on loans. If you default on your loan, the lender is likely to pursue legal action in order to recoup their losses. This could lead to wage garnishment, asset seizure, and even bankruptcy.

Your Credit Will Suffer

A hard money loan is a high-interest, short-term loan. This means that if you can’t make your payments, you’ll end up with a high-interest debt that will damage your credit score. This could impact your ability to get future loans and may even prevent you from renting an apartment or buying a car.

You’ll Waste a Key Investment Opportunity

Hard money loan financing is expensive. If you can’t pay back your debt, it will represent a significant waste of potential income that could have been used to grow your business or fund future investments.

You May Lose Your Equity

When you take out a hard money loan, you’re typically required to put up some form of collateral. If you can’t make your payments, the lender has the right to sell that collateral in order to recoup their losses. This could mean losing all or part of the equity you’ve built up in your property.

You’ll End Up in a Stressful Situation

If you default on your hard money loan, things are likely to get very stressful. You may face legal action that will require hiring an attorney and could lead to bankruptcy or foreclosure proceedings against your property.

This is why it’s so important for borrowers to make their payments on time; if they can’t do this, there’ll be significant consequences down the road.

You May Need Hard Money Loans Again in the Future

The repercussions of not making timely repayments with a hard money lender may prevent you from getting loans in the future. This means that even if you manage to save up enough capital for another project, borrowing funds might become extremely difficult without good credit history and high-income levels.

You Can Ruin Your Business Relationship With the Lender

If you have a good relationship with your hard money lender, it may be possible to work out a repayment plan that allows you to avoid some or all of the consequences listed above. However, if you don’t repay your debt as agreed upon, you could ruin this relationship and make it difficult to borrow money from them in the future.

As you can see, there are several consequences for defaulting on loan, paying on time will help you avoid all of these unfortunate outcomes and save your business.

Employment Reference Checks – Best Practices When Checking Employee References!

Employment reference checks are considered as one of the best tools to inquire about a prospective employee. Reference checking has always been an important factor for all the companies who want to make the informed decision of hiring the right employee.These days’ applicants are asked to provide employment references, such as previous employers or coworkers, whom employers can contact to learn more about the candidate. Employment reference checks are used to verify truthfulness and accuracy of information applicants provide about themselves and to reveal negative job-related background information hidden by the applicants.Unfortunately, previous employers are increasingly reluctant to provide references or background check information for fear of being sued by previous employees for defamation. If former employers provide potential employers with unsubstantiated information that damages applicants’ chances of being hired, applicants can (and do) sue for defamation. As a result, 54 percent of employers will not provide information about previous employees.This situation is very discouraging for employers as it creates a hindrance in their fair selection process and in determining the true value of an employee. But as we know that there is always a way to handle things with care to get optimum results without a problem. So by remembering the basic goals and using best practices in employment reference checks cannot only save time but also relieve all the fears of defamation.Two Essential Goals for Employment Reference Checks:
To discourage applicants to hide something. An applicant with a serious criminal conviction is less likely to apply in the organizations that announce pre-employment background and referencing.
To encourage applicants to be very honest in their applications and interviews. Since applicants are told there is a background check, they have a motivation to reveal information about themselves they feel may be uncovered with a probable reference check.
Best Practices When Checking Employment References: Employers have a number of options with regard to checking the references of a prospective employee. These can change from having the human resources person or the hiring manager call the former supervisor directly to check the reference, to third party to collect background information on a candidate, including checking references, and then reporting back to prospective employer.If an employer decides for employment reference checks than they should be looking into the following guidelines:
Include a statement on the application for employment directly above the applicant’s signature line stating that all information on the application on the application is subject to verification and that any false or misleading information may result in refusal to hire or, if already hired, the immediate termination of employment.
Require every applicant for employment to sign a waiver and consent form authorizing the prospective employer to check references and authorizing all former employers, supervisors, and managers to release information in response to a request for a reference and/or verification of employment.
Establish a written procedure for reference checking including when in the hiring process reference checks will be conducted, who will conduct the reference checks, and what kinds of documentation will be kept of information obtained through reference check.
Limit questions to information that is job-related; don’t ask for medical information, information about physical characteristics, and/or other personal information that is not related to the employee’s conduct on the job.
Consider preparing a list of job-related questions that will be asked of all finalists for a particular position. This may help avoid claims of discrimination or claims that prospective employer inquired about the information that it was not legally entitled to have.
Be fair and consistent.

How To Pay Off Your Mortgage In 5 Years

My wife and I were “home buyers” for at least 7 years on our current residence. Notice that I said home “buyers,” and not home “owners.” There is a common misconception that when you take out a mortgage, you are immediately a home “owner”

Assuming that you have a 30 year mortgage, the reality is that you are simply in the process of buying the home over a 30 year period. The bank, is the true owner of the property. If you don’t believe me, try missing a few mortgage payments, and see what happens.

3 months ago, we paid off our 30 year mortgage (in 7 years, or 23 years early). Now we are true home “owners.” In this article, I’m going to show you step by step how we were able to accomplish this. Using our existing income, and without incurring any additional debt.

Equity

Let’s talk about “Equity.” Equity, or appreciation, is the difference between what your home is worth and what you owe to the bank. So if you owe $100,000 and your house is worth $300,000, then you have $200,000 of Equity in your home.

We had roughly $250,000 of Equity on our house. We owed the bank $115,000 and our house was worth $367,000.

This $250,000 is dormant. Meaning, it looks good, but it wasn’t doing anything for us.

Home-Equity Line of Credit (HELOC)

So the first thing that we did was we ‘tapped’ into this equity. We went to the bank and took out an Home Equity Line of Credit for $50,000.

What is an equity line of credit? Also called a HELOC, an home equity line of credit is a liquid line that you are able to draw funds from at any time for any purpose. It’s like a gigantic credit card.

Although the HELOC had a limit for $50,000, the amount that we owed on it was $0 at the time that we took it out. This is because, similar to a credit card, you don’t owe anything until you actually use it.

Use HELOC to Pay Down Mortgage

Immediately after we got the HELOC, we withdrew $20,000 and applied it to our Mortgage (additional principal payment).

So at this point, we have $20,000 due on the HELOC, but our mortgage has been paid down by $20,000 (from $115,000 to $95,000).

Use HELOC as “new” Checking Account

Before I go on, let me mention that after we used the $20,000 to pay down our mortgage, we still had the same $115,000 of debt ($20,000 on HELOC and $95,000 on Mortgage).

So to payoff the HELOC, we just used it as our new checking account. When we got paid, we took 100% of our paychecks and applied it to the HELOC.

Now you may be wondering, “with all of our money going to the HELOC, how did we pay our bills?” Remember the HELOC is a “liquid” line. So at the end of each month, we made 1 withdrawal from the HELOC to pay our bills (including our mortgage).

100% of Cash Flow

For us, our monthly paychecks totaled roughly $6,000. Our bills, including our mortgage, and all of our living expenses (gas, groceries, etc.) totaled approximately $3,500. So by applying 100% of our monthly checks to the HELOC, and then using the HELOC to pay our bills, we were able to use 100% of our monthly cash flow to pay the $20,000 HELOC off.

So with and estimated $2,500 of cash flow ($6,000 minus $3,500) the $20,000 was paid off in 8 months.

Repeat The Process

We repeated this process until the remaining $95,000 was paid off (approximately 2 years).

What Do You Need?

1. Cash Flow – You must have positive cash flow in your household budget

2. Credit Score – A decent credit score (650 or above)

3. Equity – Positive equity in your home.

What You Should Know

VERY IMPORTANT: The HELOC should be used to paydown your mortgage. It should not be used to fund a vacation, buy a car, or a boat.

ALSO IMPORTANT: The HELOC is not a Home Equity Loan (HEL). A Home Equity Loan is a 2nd mortgage, and it is treated the same.